Moving to Mississippi - Best Places to Live in Mississippi | My Move

Southern hospitality runs deep in Mississippi, and its people are genuinely helpful, polite and generous, and possess an innate sense of community, even for those who are not natives.

Moving Advice

When moving to Mississippi, prepare yourself for the kind of weather you can expect to experience when you arrive. Summers in Mississippi are long and hot; winters are short and mild. Mississippi weather also includes regular hurricanes, tornadoes and thunderstorms, so you’ll want to familiarize yourself with proper evacuation procedures.

Be sure to check with your new neighborhood or building landlord for any specific parking permits you will need. If possible, it’s a great idea to get these permits ahead of time, to avoid any unnecessary parking tickets once you arrive and begin to get settled. Visit GOMDOT.com to obtain the necessary permits you may need for your move to Mississippi.

Will you be hiring a professional moving company? Stick to those that have been pre-screened, licensed and bonded, and offer full US moving services. All reputable moving companies will give you a free quote for your move, so it’s important to call at least three to get the best price. Moving rates tend to be higher on certain days—particularly during the last week of the month. You can save money by asking which day is cheaper.

Have all of your belongings carefully packed and ready when the movers show up; these companies charge a hefty packing and unpacking fee in addition to the moving fees. If you can, unpack all of your belongings yourself after the move.

Most moving companies charge by the hour for local moves or by weight for long-distance moves. Regardless of how the rates are determined, one factor remains true for all companies: the less stuff you have to move, the less it will cost you. Consider getting rid of the extraneous items you don’t need, and make a little extra cash by holding a yard sale prior to your move. Additionally, you can sell unwanted items on eBay and Craigslist or donate them to your local charity.

When moving to Mississippi, prepare yourself for the kind of weather you can expect to experience when you arrive. Summers in Mississippi are long and hot, winters are short and mild. Keep this in mind when picking a move date. Mississippi weather also includes regular hurricanes, tornadoes and thunderstorms, so you’ll want to familiarize yourself with proper evacuation procedures if you have not previously experienced extreme weather of this kind.

Be sure to check with your new neighborhood or building landlord for any specific parking permits you will need. If possible, it’s a great idea to get these permits ahead of time, to avoid any unnecessary parking tickets once you arrive and begin to get settled. Visit GOMDOT.com to obtain the necessary permits you may need for your move to Mississippi.

Avoid any interruptions of your mail service by alerting the USPS of your new address as soon as you know it. This can be easily completed online. Additionally, a moving packet is available to pick up at any US Post Office.

Referring to the moving Checklist will help make sure you’ve covered all the bases to keep your move as smooth as possible.

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Cities and Metro Areas

Moving to Mississippi doesn’t mean you’ll have to give up any of the pleasures you may be accustomed to in any other state. Mississippi’s major cities offer all of the amenities available in perhaps larger, more densely populated cities. Jackson, Hattiesburg, Biloxi and Gulfport are the four major cities in Mississippi, with Jackson as the state capital. These major cities are closely located in the southern half of the state, interspersed with massive forest and farming lands, many rural areas and countless tiny towns.

Cost of Living

The cost of living in Mississippi is much lower than the national average by at least 15 percent, and has remained relatively stable over recent years. However, keep in mind that the average salary tends to be lower here as well. When looking for jobs in Mississippi, it may be helpful to know that Jackson has one of the highest yearly salary averages in the state, while Meridian has one of the lowest.

Mississippi has the lowest per capita personal income of any state, but also has the nation's lowest living costs. And despite the low income rates, Mississippians consistently rank as one of the highest per capita in charitable contributions.

Highways and Public Transport

Four major Interstates run through Mississippi: I-10, I-20, I-55 and I-59. It is exceedingly easy to travel throughout the state, with a major highway, Interstate or State road running through every major city and well into most small towns. Mississippi is flat, with long stretches of forest lining the sides of the roads in between major cities.

JATRAN is the city of Jackson’s Transit System, which operates hourly or half-hourly during daytime hours on weekdays, and hourly on Saturdays. No evening or Sunday service is provided, which is something to be aware of should you be using this mode of transportation for work.

Mississippi is somewhat behind the times in the matter of public transportation. Those coming from other major cities with established, frequent and updated forms of public transport may find Mississippi sorely lacking. Consisting only of city bus services, there are no light rails, trams or commuter trains available. State funds simply cannot afford it, and the demand doesn’t seem to be very high.

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Relocation Resources

When looking to relocate to Mississippi, bigger cities will mean better opportunities, with higher earning potentials. Jobs in Mississippi tend to fluctuate greatly depending on the area. The Southeast (Gulfport/Biloxi) shows the largest increase in job potential. Those within the construction and building industries, and those involved in all facets of the service industry, can expect to find favorable job prospects within the state.

Gulfport has perhaps the greatest need for those in construction and building services. A certain percentage of the city’s population did not return after being evacuated when Hurricane Katrina hit. The restoration plans for the port and city are extensive and will take place over many years to come. Additionally, there is a high demand for those in the service industry; hotel staff, restaurant workers and people in the tourist trade can all expect to find many jobs in Mississippi.

Climate

Mississippi is hot and humid almost nine months of the year, with heavy rainfalls and frequent, extreme weather storms in the form of hurricanes, thunder and tropical storms. Tornadoes also occur in most parts of Mississippi. Rain often comes in a torrential downpour, but usually only lasts for a short while before the sun and humidity take over again. Late summer into fall are the peak seasonal times for hurricanes, particularly in the southern half of the state, and flooding usually occurs between December and June.

Winter is short and mild, rarely getting cold enough to leave a thin frost on the grass or your windshield in the morning. However, it does feel colder to those who have become used to the normally hot and humid climate. The areas surrounding the Mississippi Sound tend to stay significantly warmer, as the water retains the heat from the long summers.

Education

The southern state of Mississippi is home to over 50 colleges, universities and technical schools. Jackson houses nearly half of all the colleges in Mississippi. Mississippi College, Mississippi State University and the University of Mississippi are ranked among the best colleges in the southeastern US. Additionally, the Mississippi University for Women made US News & World Report’s list of Best Southern Schools, and Forbes gave the Mississippi University for Women a place on their list of Best Public Colleges. University of Southern Mississippi is also a notable education institution.

For top-notch elementary schools, look into Davis Magnet School,
Watkins Elementary School and George Elementary School in Jackson. In Gulfport, Bayou View Elementary is highly ranked.

The top-ranking high schools in Mississippi include Corinth High School in Corinth, Lewisburg High School in Olive Branch and West Lauderdale High School in Collinsville.

Government

There are numerous services that the Government provides within the State of Mississippi, all with corresponding websites. Moving to a state that you are unfamiliar with can be a daunting task, so take advantage of the valuable information that has been made available online. The following are a few helpful links to get you started: